Pros And Cons Of Moving Into A Tiny House

Tiny house for sale on a lot.

If you’ve channel surfed lately, you’ve probably discovered television programs about “tiny homes.” Usually under 400 square feet and with some barely 100 square feet, these small and generally mobile structures have received a lot of attention. New tiny homes often cost somewhere between $22,000 and $55,000 and offer an alternative home-owning experience.

Are tiny homes a short-term fad or a viable residential alternative as land values soar?Or will today’s tiny home become tomorrow’s headache, something more difficult to unload than a timeshare? Is this a trend worth considering if we want to reduce clutter and maybe live off-the-grid?

Let’s examine some of the pros and cons of owning a tiny home:

There are lots of reasons to give tiny living a try. Here are some:

  • You’ll have greater mobility and flexibility.
  • Since it’s a smaller square footage, you can splurge on better building materials and work with designers to create the home you want for much less than a traditional home costs.
  • You’ll have the benefit of owning both a home and a camper. Avoid expensive hotel rooms and restaurants by traveling in your tiny home during your vacations. You can move away from an area but keep your home as you take it with you on wheels.
  • Many tiny homes are designed to include innovative storage solutions.
  • Without a large pantry, you’ll probably eat much healthier and add more fresh foods to your diet.
  • With less living space, you’ll save money on utilities and, with no room for them, probably buy a lot less things as well, saving money along the way.
  • Smaller structures tend to be more energy efficient since you’ll need to heat or cool a smaller space rather than a traditional house. Solar panels may be an option on many of these new structures.
  • With less space to accumulate clutter, these units are easier and quicker to clean.
Interior design of a dining room and kitchen in a tiny house.

Of course there are downsides:

  • It’s small. Yes, it’s true. If you like ot entertain or have a big family that likes to stay over, this may not be for you. If you have big dogs, or just need big spaces to feel comfortable, this is not for you.
  • You will sacrifice comfort for some of the space considerations. The compact washer/dryer unit might be next to the toilet or the kitchen sink. Also, you’re probably not going to have room for much exercise equipment or a gym.
  • Limited storage space requires that you have to buy food and supplies in smaller portions unless you have alternative storage to store items in bulk. Small portions usually cost more and create more packaging waste.
  • Lacking storage space and a larger refrigerator, you will probably spend more time cooking because you won’t have a lot of storage options for unprepared or cooked food. Or, you might end up eating out more, resulting in spending more money.
  • If you plan to move your tiny home, you’ll need a larger vehicle to relocate it.
  • Zoning and residential codes are not consistent. In some areas, a tiny home may be classified as an RV or have to stay in a campground.
  • Heating or cooling units for tiny homes may not be as efficient as those available for traditional houses.
  • Though easier to clean, you’ll have to dust and de-clutter more frequently since you’ll use much of the living space daily.

More Facts about Tiny Homes to Think About

Tiny home small wooden rustic cabin house.
  • If you plan to travel in your tiny house, become aware of local ordinances where you hope to visit. If you plan to keep this structure at a single location, investigate any zoning or statutory restrictions at that site before you commit to buying. Also, consider the impact the tiny house may have on ad valorem property taxes if kept on a plot of land.
  • If you want to put the structure behind your current house or on a friend’s property, investigate the possibility of it gaining status as an accessory dwelling unit (ADU), a smaller living space on a parcel with an existing single-family home.  You could also consider using in it as a recreational structure rather than as your primary residence or rent it out when not using it.
  • Think about where you plan to travel.  Do you want to live off-the-grid or with utility hookups?  Do you prefer solar energy and composting toilets, or electricity and sewerage or septic systems?

Find the Right Home and Community for You

Eco-friendly wood tiny house at the woods. Energy saving

Whether you choose a tiny home because you are eco-conscious, frugal, looking for freedom or just think they’re cute, these homes are definitely trending up. There are more and more communities of tiny home dwellers popping up across the country, creating new lifestyles and opportunities to find simpler ways to live no matter where you are. Follow your dream and find a home the right size for your needs. If 100 square feet is too small, you can still settle for a 600 square feet traditional home, save money and still keep your living space well below the national average. After all, if there’s one place you want to be happy, there’s no place like home.

Moving Services for Your Move to a Tiny House

Wherever you are going, Move 4 Less is your Las Vegas, Nevada-based moving company. Whether you plan to downsize, need a storage solution in the Las Vegas area, or move to a new residence, our move professionals can help you choose the right storage option for your needs and find a cost-effective and eco-friendly way to move. Contact us today for a free move quote.

Share this article